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October 2005 Newsletter

Make Your Cardio Workout BLAST OFF!


Dear Fellow Business Traveler,


Time, time, time, or the lack thereof, is the bane of the business traveler's existence. You can save time and still get a great cardio workout through interval training. Intervals allow you to burn more calories by increasing the overall intensity of your workout. In this month's newsletter, we outline several interval routines that will help you blast calories in just 30 minutes. Print them out and take them with you on your next trip!


As always, there's plenty of new activity in the Travel Fitness Blog, including Travel Fit Tips and news releases from your favorite hotels and airlines.

To Your Health,
Customer Service, Healthy Travel Network and Chief Fitness Officer




squareCardio Blast


All cardiovascular exercise helps elevate your metabolism, allowing you to burn more calories throughout the day (another great reason to exercise in the morning). Interval training not only boosts your cardiovascular system and metabolism, but provides an extra kick by allowing you to burn more calories during the same time period than you would doing "steady state" cardio.

Below, we outline two 30-minute interval routines--one for beginners and one for more advanced folks. Remember to check with your physician before beginning any exercise program, and remember to listen to your body. If you feel faint or dizzy, STOP exercising!

Each routine can be done on your favorite cardio machine: walking or running on the treadmill, biking, or on the elliptical or cross trainer machine. To increase your calorie burn even more, take your walking or running outside.

The key to interval training is to push yourself during the intervals, but also to make sure you complete each interval. If you can't complete the intervals at a certain intensity level, drop it down a notch so that you can get through the routine. Because everyone is at a slightly different fitness level and because the equipment at each hotel will vary, we describe the intensity level of the intervals in terms of Rate of Perceived Exertion, or RPE. Developed by Swedish physiologist, Dr. Gunnar Borg, the scale provides a subjective measure of how hard you are working. You can learn more about RPE on About.com's sports medicine site.
Travel Fitness Blog
Understanding the Glycemic Index
How Much Exercise Do You Need?
Don't Resist Resistance Training
Borg RPE Scale

6

No exertion at all
7


7.5

Extremely light
8


9

Very light
10


11

Light
12


13

Somewhat hard
14


15

Hard (Heavy)
16


17

Very hard
18


19

Extremely hard
20

Maximal

© Gunnar Borg, 1970, 1985, 1994, 1998


squareBeginning Interval Routine


Minutes

Activity
RPE
5

Warm-Up
8-9
1

Base Station
11-12
2

Recovery
9-10
2

Climb
11-12
3

Recovery
9-10
2

Vertical Climb
12-13
3

Recovery
9-10
1

Summit
12-13
3

Recovery
9-10
1

Max Summit
12-13
3

Recovery
9-10
5

Cool-Down
8-9
30

Total Minutes





squareAdvanced Interval Routine


Minutes

Activity
RPE
5

Warm-Up
8-9
1

Base Station
11-12
1

Recovery 10-11
3

Camp 1
12-13
2

Recovery 10-11
3

Peak
13-14
2

Recovery 10-11
2

Vertical Climb
14-15
2

Recovery 10-11
2

Summit
15-16
2

Recovery
10-11
5

Cool-Down
8-9
30

Total Minutes



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